SREL Reprint #2964

 

 

 

Long-term success of stump sprout regeneration in baldcypress


Richard F. Keim, Jim L.Chambers, Melinda S. Hughes, Emile S. Gardiner, William H. Conner,
John W. Day, Jr., Stephen P. Faulkner, Kenneth W. McLeod, Craig A. Miller, J. Andrew Nyman,
Gary P. Shaffer, and Luben D. Dimov1

1Assistant Professor, Weaver Brothers Professor of Forestry, and Research Associate, respectively, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Renewable Natural Resources Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803; Research Forester, Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research, USDA Forest Service, Stoneville, MS 38776-0227; Professor, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology and Forest Science, Clemson University, Georgetown, SC 29442; Professor, Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, 1002-Y Energy, Coast and Environment Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803; Ecologist, USGS National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette LA 70506; Associate Research Ecologist, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802; Assistant Professor, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803; Assistant Professor, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803; Associate Professor, Southeastern Louisiana University Department of Biological Sciences, Hammond, LA 70402-0343; Postdoctoral Associate, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, respectively.

Abstract: Baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.] is one of very few conifers that produces stump sprouts capable of becoming full-grown trees. Previous studies have addressed early survival of baldcypress stump sprouts but have not addressed the likelihood of sprouts becoming an important component of mature stands. We surveyed stands throughout south Louisiana, selectively harvested 10 to 41 years ago, to determine whether stump sprouts are an important mechanism of regeneration. At each site we inventoried stumps and measured stump height and diameter, presence and number of sprouts, sprout height, and water depth. We determined age and diameter growth rate for the largest sprout from each stump from increment cores. The majority of stumps did not have surviving sprouts. Sprouts that did survive were generally vigorous, but rot from stumps often appeared to be spreading into the bases of sprouts. Within the stands studied, baldcypress stump sprouts did not appear to be able to consistently produce viable regeneration sufficient for long-term establishment of well-stocked stands.

SREL Reprint #2964

Keim, R. F., J. L. Chambers, M. S. Hughes, E. S. Gardiner, W. H. Conner, J. W. Day, Jr., S. P. Faulkner, K. W. McLeod, C. A. Miller, J. A. Nyman, G. P. Shaffer, and L. D. Dimov. 2006. Long-term success of stump sprout regeneration in baldcypress. p. 559-563 In K. F. Connor (Ed.). Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

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