SREL Reprint #1910

 

 

 

 

REPRODUCTIVE PATTERNS OF REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS: CONSIDERATIONS FOR CAPTIVE BREEDING AND CONSERVATION

J. WHITFIELD GIBBONS

Introduction

ALTERATION OR DESTRUCTION OF THE REPRODUCTIVE link in the life cycle of a species can cause dramatic declines in population sizes and lead to the imminent disappearance of the species from a region. Thus, reproductive patterns are vital in the captive management and conservation of amphibians and reptiles.

The topic of reproductive patterns of particular groups of reptiles and amphibians has been addressed thoroughly. Amphibian reproduction has been bountifully covered by Duellman and Trueb (1986 [1985]). A variety of publications have satisfactorily covered reptilian reproductive strategies, such as Ford and Seigel (1989) for snakes; Moll (1979),Wllbur and Morin(1988), and Iverson (1991) for turtles; and Tinkle et al. (1970), Dunham et al. (1988), and others for lizards. The emphasis of this chapter is on the connection between reproductive patterns and conservation efforts.

SREL Reprint #1910

Gibbons, J.W. 1994. Reproductive patterns of reptiles and amphibians: considerations for captive breeding and conservation. In Captive Management and Conservation of Amphibians and Reptiles, A Volume Honoring Roger Conant, edited by J.B. Murphy, K. Adler, and J.T. Collins. p. 119-123. Vol. Contributions to Herpetology, Vol. II. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. Ithaca, NY.

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