SREL Reprint #0895

 

 

 

Fate of Anthracene in an Artificial Stream: A Case Study

Peter F. Landrum, Steven M. Bartell, John P. Giesy, Gordon J. Leversee, John W. Bowling, John Haddock, Katie LaGory, Sara Gerould, and Mary Bruno

 

Abstract

The fate of anthracene, a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, was followed in a large outdoor stream microcosm.  The major nonadvective route for the removal of anthracene was phototolytic degradation to anthraquinone (half-life 43 min).  The anthraquinone also photolyzed rapidly in this shallow stream system.  Excluding the plastic channel liner, the sediment acts as the major sink for anthracene, absorbing 0.2% of the 14-day input dose.  The periphyton community was the second most important sink, absorbing 0.045% of the input dose.  All other compartments were of significantly less importance on a mass basis.  Anthracene (11 g liter-1) caused photo-induced 100% mortality of the bluegill sunfish in 9 hr in the upstream reach.  Fish at the downstream station survived for ~ 26 hr and all died within 1 hr of each other.  Other organisms, clams and dragonfly larvae, started to die off toward the end of the 14 day input period.

 

SREL Reprint #0895

 Landrum, P.F., S.M. Bartell, J.P. Giesy, G.J. Leversee, J.W. Bowling, J. Haddock, K. LaGory, S. Gerould, and M. Bruno. 1984. Fate of anthracene in an artificial stream: a case study. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 8:183-201.

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